Episode 015 | The Millionaires' Unit

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Enjoy a deep dive into the documentary filmmaking process with Darroch Greer and Ron King as they discuss their film The Millionaires' Unit. 

The Film tells the unsung story of a group of Yale college students who took the initiative to learn to fly in preparation for America’s entry into World War I and became the founding squadron of the U.S. Naval Air Reserve.

The award winning film’s VOD release date of February 15, 2018 was chosen to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the death of First Yale Unit member Albert D. Sturtevant, the first U.S. Naval Aviator killed in combat, when his plane went down in the North Sea on February 15, 1918.

Narrated by Academy Award® nominated actor Bruce Dern, grandnephew of one of the aviators, the feature length documentary charts the romantic, little known story of the origins of American airpower and features very rare archival footage and thrilling dogfighting sequences filmed air to air with replica WW1 planes, some with original engines.

Inspired by Marc Wortman’s book The Millionaires’ Unit the film has been developed and produced by descendants of the First Yale Unit, including filmmaker Ron King, producers Harry Davison and Mike Davison, and narrator Bruce Dern who are all grandnephews and grandsons of FYU members.

EPISODE 014 | THE RELATIONSHIP IS EVERYTHING

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The relationship between instructor and student is paramount. As is the relationship between you motivation and your ultimace success. Businessman and friend Marc Dean joins us to talk about his experience getting his Private Pilot License. Things weren’t right where he started and Marc’s gut feeling was that he wasn’t in the right place. Are you in the right place? Listen as we talk about common issues like: Student/Instructor relationship, Flight School vs. Flying Club, Concentrating on the process and craft vs. “beating the numbers.” 

Sometimes a little mentorship goes a long way. Marc needed some and I’m glad we met. 

Congrats to Brian Juarez for winning the iPad Airway Manual Case! Look forward to more Patron and non-Patron giveaways in the future!

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Music by: Reaktor Productions

EPISODE 012 | SHAESTA WAIZ - DREAMS SOAR INC.

If you’re listening to this podcast, I’m guessing you’ve heard of Shaesta Waiz. But on the off chance you haven’t, she's the youngest woman to fly around the world. Solo. Only 6 WOMEN (of any age) have ever done it before her, in the history of aviation. But she didn’t do it for glory, she did it to help children all over the world become interested in STEM concepts, and in aviation as a career. 

She is the first Afghan woman to earn a civilian pilot’s license. 

She’s the first in her family to attend college.

She’s the founder and President of Dreams Soar Inc. A nonprofit she founded still in her 20s to help women all over the world land careers in STEM related fields. Her organization provides inspiration, outreach, and scholarships for young women with dreams of careers in fields involving Science Technology Engineering, and Math.

From her birth in an Afghan refugee camp, she was groomed for a traditional life as a mother and founder of a large family, more than the founder of a non-profit with global reach. But she decided to break the mold and travel the world encouraging young women to do the same.

Although she does still love to cook...

EPISODE 008: AVIATE, NAVIGATE, COMMUNICATE | NEWS | NEW WEBSITE!

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Aviate, Navigate, Communicate

A short experimental episode!

What do you guys think? Should we continue with news content?

Stories:

-Landing a drone on HMS Queen Elizabeth? -Flyingmag.com

-Know Thyself -AOPA

-FAA denies Signature FBO Complaint -AOPA

-Hitting back against outrageous fuel prices -planeandpilotmag

-ATC Privitization Emergency Checklist -AOPA

-DeLorean DR-7 -Flyingmag.com

 

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Music by Reaktor Productions

Copyright 2017 Podcastingonaplane.

EPISODE 007: UAS and YOU!

A candid discussion about UAS (drones) with Steve Nelson and Jeff Riolo

Visualize UAS Airspace:http://uas-faa.opendata.arcgis.comhttps://www.faa.gov/uas/

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Copyright Podcasting On A Plane

EPISODE 006: How old is too old? | Listener Feedback | Changes at KSNA

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In this Episode:

Feedback from:David Abbey - Thoughts on a brief ATC career

Kerry - How old is too old to fly?

Interview: Anthony Tamburrini Future Airline Pilot

Changes at KSNA as ACI Jet takes over for Signature

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Intro/Outro music by: Reaktor Productions

Copyright 2017 Podcasting On A Plane

EPISODE 001: MY STORY

...In the immediate aftermath I remember coming to, hanging upside down by my seatbelt and right in front of my face was a broken piece of glass. As I hung there, I was able to put together that what it was the rear window of the 210. through the broken glass a few inches from my face,  I could see some dirt, a little smashed piece of grass and a stunned little bug crawling around. I was able to figure out that i was hanging upside down...

 TELLURIDE, CO 05/19/1990, 1600 MDT CESSNA 210L    Accident Number: Registration: Aircraft Damage:     Injuries:    DEN90FA109   N2403S   Substantial   3 Serious, 1 Minor, 2 None   Part 91: General Aviation - Business   AFTER HAVING DISCUSSED THE LOCAL ADVERSE WIND CONDITIONS NEAR THE DEPARTURE END OF THE RUNWAY WITH AIRPORT OPERATION PERSONNEL, THE PRIVATE PILOT ELECTED TO ATTEMPT THE FLIGHT. HE SAID THAT DURING HIS TAKEOFF CLIMB HE UNEXPECTEDLY ENCOUNTERED A VERY STRONG DOWNDRAFT. IN AN ATTEMPT TO MAINTAIN ALTITUDE, THE AIRCRAFT STALLED AND COLLIDED WITH THE GROUND. DESPITE WARNING FROM AIRCRAFT PERSONNEL, THE PILOT STATED BEFORE THE FLIGHT THAT HE SHOULD ATTEMPT TO CLIMB OVER ADVERSE WINDS RATHER THAN MAINTAIN ADDITIONAL AIRSPEED. THE AIRPLANE WAS VERY NEAR MAXIMUM GROSS WEIGHT AND THE PILOT USED 20 DEGREES OF FLAPS, INSTEAD OF THE RECOMMENDED 10. THE PILOT WAS AWARE OF A BOOKLET AT THE AIRPORT WARNING OF HAZARDOUS WIND CONDITIONS, ESPECIALLY WHEN WINDS WERE SOUTHERLY IN EXCESS OF 10 M.P.H. DENSITY ALTITUDE WAS 10,760 FEET.    Probable Cause and Findings    The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: THE PILOT'S FAILURE TO MAINTAIN FLYING SPEED WHICH RESULTED IN A STALL. FACTOR WAS WIND SHEAR REPORTED OFF DEPARTURE END OF RWY. 

TELLURIDE, CO 05/19/1990, 1600 MDT CESSNA 210L 

Accident Number: Registration: Aircraft Damage: 

Injuries: 

DEN90FA109 

N2403S 

Substantial 

3 Serious, 1 Minor, 2 None 

Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

AFTER HAVING DISCUSSED THE LOCAL ADVERSE WIND CONDITIONS NEAR THE DEPARTURE END OF THE RUNWAY WITH AIRPORT OPERATION PERSONNEL, THE PRIVATE PILOT ELECTED TO ATTEMPT THE FLIGHT. HE SAID THAT DURING HIS TAKEOFF CLIMB HE UNEXPECTEDLY ENCOUNTERED A VERY STRONG DOWNDRAFT. IN AN ATTEMPT TO MAINTAIN ALTITUDE, THE AIRCRAFT STALLED AND COLLIDED WITH THE GROUND. DESPITE WARNING FROM AIRCRAFT PERSONNEL, THE PILOT STATED BEFORE THE FLIGHT THAT HE SHOULD ATTEMPT TO CLIMB OVER ADVERSE WINDS RATHER THAN MAINTAIN ADDITIONAL AIRSPEED. THE AIRPLANE WAS VERY NEAR MAXIMUM GROSS WEIGHT AND THE PILOT USED 20 DEGREES OF FLAPS, INSTEAD OF THE RECOMMENDED 10. THE PILOT WAS AWARE OF A BOOKLET AT THE AIRPORT WARNING OF HAZARDOUS WIND CONDITIONS, ESPECIALLY WHEN WINDS WERE SOUTHERLY IN EXCESS OF 10 M.P.H. DENSITY ALTITUDE WAS 10,760 FEET. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: THE PILOT'S FAILURE TO MAINTAIN FLYING SPEED WHICH RESULTED IN A STALL. FACTOR WAS WIND SHEAR REPORTED OFF DEPARTURE END OF RWY.